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  spacerBirds of San Miguel & Surrounding Areas
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COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME NOMBRE COMUN
H
S
A
 GREBES
Least Grebe Tachybaptus dominicus Zambullidor menor
W
Y
C
Pied-billed Grebe Podilymbus podiceps Zambullidor picogrueso
W
Y
C
Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis  Zambullidor orejudo
W
Y
U
 
 PELICANS & CORMORANTS
American White Pelican Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Pelicano blanco 
W
W
*
Neotropic Cormorant Phalacrocorax  brasilianus Cormoran olivacea
W
V
*

Go to complete Bird List

Resources to help you identify birds by sound:

http://www.bird-sounds.net
http://www.xeno-canto.org


 
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  spacerBird Sightings
spacerby Walter L. Meagher Photos by Wayne Colony
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THE NORTHERN CARDINAL (Cardinalis cardinalis)

This stunning songbird is hard to miss and always a beautiful sight to see.

Besides its bright red body, the male is identified by its prominent crest, a reddish bill and black face around the bill. It is approximately 8-9" in length.
 
With its flamboyant color and tendency to sing from high open perches, you'd think that the male cardinal would be a "sitting duck" for predator hawks, but in fact the redder the male, the more successful he is in defending his territory and finding a mate. His redness is an indication of good health. The oldest recorded cardinals were over 15 years old, which may also be attributed to the fact that as non-migratory birds they do not have to endure the stress of annual migration.

Females are pale brown overall with warm reddish tinges in the wings, tail, and crest. They have the same black face and red-orange bill. The female’s muted colors provide her and her nest with a protective camouflage that the male lacks. Look for nests in live trees, shrubs, or vine tangles, in open woodlands, dry shrubby areas, disturbed tangles, suburbs, backyards, and even deserts.

The female Northern Cardinal is one of the few North American female songbirds that sing, and often while sitting on the nest, which may give the male information about when to bring food. A mated pair shares song phrases, but the female may sing a longer and slightly more complex song than the male.

The Cardinal's short, very thick bill indicates that it eats mainly seeds and fruit, although they supplement their diet with insects, which is the preferred food to feed their young as well. Common fruits and seeds include grasses, sedges, blackberry, and corn, which is why we are likely to see them at the edges of corn fields. They also eat beetles, crickets, katydids, leafhoppers, cicadas, flies, centipedes, spiders, butterflies, and moths. For backyard feeding, Cardinals eat many kinds of birdseed, particularly black oil sunflower seed.

Click here to learn more and to listen to their song!
Sources: Cornell Ornithology Lab, All About Birds
 
 
Go to complete Bird Sightings List arr    
 
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